Experimental Dental Procedures

We live in a world where new breakthroughs in technology, medicine, and dentistry are being made everyday. One hundred years ago, the world of dentistry was very limited. Teeth were either pulled or filled with toxic substances. A formula has not yet been devised which will regrow teeth, but there are advancements which can fix almost any smile. Some of these procedures have not been perfected yet, but the possibilities are definitely exciting.

The process of installing zygomatic implant may prove an option for those who want implants, but have insufficient jawbone structure to support them. These implants would be installed into the cheek bone. This procedure was first done by Dr. Maria Papageorge and was made possible through a grant from Tufts University.

The studies need to be continued to determine the longevity of the implants, but the university is offering it to a select few patients for roughly $11,000. This is less than 25% of the tradition $45,000 price tag which comes with implants. It is too early to say if this will become a less expensive solution for tooth loss. But, since it requires fewer connection, this may become the case.

Dentistry is usually associated with the painful and loud sound of dental drill. A new technique called Air Abrasion may change that. Instead of using a metal drill, a stream of particles is aimed at the decaying area of a tooth. In this particle mixture is aluminum oxide, baking soda, and silica, these are run through a blast of air which exits out of the hand piece.

The Air Abrasion technique is a lot quieter than a drill and does not produce pressure or vibration. It can still cause pain though, especially in patients who are sensitive to pressure. This technique reduces the amount of anesthesia needed for shallow cavities. The metal drill will still have its place because fittings for crowns can not be prepared using air abrasion. It also cannot be used for root canals. Some dentists ultimately believe that the use of air abrasion will reduce the risk of chipping and dental fractures as well.

Think about the countless times that the use of anesthesia has left you numb for hours afterwards. It is awkward to eat and drink until that numbness goes away. In fact, in some cases it can take up to five hours for the effects to be completely gone. A new medication called OraVerse reverses the effects of the anesthesia and can take the time for the numbness to wear off down to about an hour.

This is great news for those who scheduled dental visits before picking kids up from school, between errands, or any other time when full oral function will be necessary. The phentolamine which is in OraVerse works by opening up blood vessels to restore blood flow to the mouth. The medication is injected immediately after the procedure is over. Since the numbness in effect, there is no need to be concerned over pain.

All of these techniques have the potential to change how we think about modern dentistry. Making it more convenient and less painful should encourage more people to tend to their teeth properly and no longer fear those dental check ups.

Copyright Dr.Jean-Jacques Edderai – 2015

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