Gold Teeth Going Away as White Smile Craze Takes Over

Gold Teeth Going Away as White Smile Craze Takes Over

A decade or so ago, to “bling” out your mouth in gold teeth was all the craze. While it is still popular in certain circles, more people are looking for a healthy, realistic look. During the height of its popularity, the gold-tooth craze was bringing in about $2.7 billion to the gold industry every year. Unfortunately for the industry, this number has dropped by 60% in the last five years.

The use of better ceramics, CEREC machines, and the outrageous price for gold have all contributed to its decline in the dental industry. The thing about fads is that they come into style, then go out of style just as quickly. Some fads, like tie-dye, eventually come back into style, only to disappear once more. Whether gilded teeth ever come back into fashion, only time will tell.

Having teeth fixed or fashioned with gold is not a new concept. As far back as 630 BCE, gold was used by the Etruscans to make dental bridges. Women of the upper class would remove an incisor (or two) and have it replaced with a golden tooth. This was a symbol of their status and standing in society.

Dental patients today have more choices and options than ever before. Ceramic crowns, laser whitening, bleaching, and advances in cosmetic dentistry make it possible for anyone to have the whitest and brightest smile of their whole lives. Gold can still be used on the back teeth as a filling, but many people still prefer the ceramic type.

When it comes to the back teeth, a gold crown is very strong and enables a lot of preservation to the tooth structure. It will not fracture like porcelain can. When done by a qualified dentist, a gold filling or crown can last a very, very long time. The downside, aside from its golden glow, is the price tag on gold. Even with the drop in price, it is still over $1,200 an ounce, making it too expensive for the average household budget. In comparison, you could get six or so composite resin fillings for the price of one gold tooth.

Nowadays, a gold “grill” is usually seen on celebrities. Regardless of if you go for the natural look or want to your mouth to sparkle like the sun, a dentist can make your smile into whatever you want it to be.

In ten years it is possible that the stark white smiles will fade away as most trends do. In its place, we may see people going for the natural look, slightly less than white, with flaws and character. No matter what trends take hold, a healthy mouth will ALWAYS be in fashion. So between your cosmetic visits, make sure to get those brushings, flossings, and dental visits in. It is much easier to whiten and brighten your teeth when they are healthy to begin with.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2016

 

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Avoid the ER for Dental Emergencies

Avoid the ER for Dental Emergencies

Every year, millions of people go to the hospital for dental problems. Whether it’s an abscess, a lost or broken tooth, or swelling, people rush to the ER to get treatment. Decades ago, when dentists were 8-5 Monday through Friday, this could be understood. But, when most dentists offer off-hours treatment this is no longer the best option when you’re in pain. In the North Miami Beach area, you can call Dr. Jean-Jacque Edderai 24 hours a day at 305-947-7999.

According to a study published in the Journal of Public Health Dentistry, in the state of Florida, trips to the ER for dental problems is costing millions in taxpayer money every year. Within the past decade, trips to the ER for dental problems rose by 57 percent. Half of the $193.4 million came from Medicare and Medicaid. This is a pointless expense since modern emergency rooms are not equipped to do anything for you. All they can do is give you a painkiller and/or antibiotic and tell you to go to a dentist.

The question then becomes, if dentists are more available then ever for emergencies, why are people still flocking to hospitals? Part of it may have to do with the Medicare/caid program in itself. In some states, like Florida, Medicaid only has to cover emergencies related to dentures, draining abscesses, and extracting teeth. Adding an option to pay online has helped some people, but it is not the only measure that we should be taking.

Since less than 10% of Florida dentists take Medicaid, many people aren’t getting desperately needed root canals and fillings. So the damage, then the pain, get worse. Until patients are out of options. The flux of people to the ER can’t be placed directly on Medicaid though. Nearly 40% of those who went to the ER for dental problems paid cash.

If there was a greater focus on prevention, then a lot of these visits could be avoided. If the $1500 per ER visit was put towards early treatment and education, we would see fewer problems, period. Another step we should be taking, as a country, is to cover routine visits and fillings. It is a twisted notion that people should have to be in excruciating pain before they can get the help they need. We don’t just see this in dental insurance, health insurance almost never covers preventative measures (one exception being birth control).

As a dentist, it is difficult to see a person with tooth pain, which is arguably the worst type of pain. By the time a person is in pain, a special procedure is a given. You are not going to go in with tooth pain, get a shot in the arm and be on your way. By the time there is pain, drilling, and filling, and applying crowns are all likely outcomes. If we instead took the time and put the money into educating people, we could save time, money, comfort, and even lives.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2016

 

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