Five Easy Ways to Change Your Diet (Without Losing Your Mind in the Process)

I would be willing to bet that most of reading this have some area of your diet that you want to change. Maybe you binge on junk food or have a huge sweet tooth. For information of fixing common dental conditions visit https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/oral-surgery-wisdom-teeth/. I’m sure you’ve heard all of the benefits of eating healthier, but it may seem like an impossible feat.

So what do you do? You have to try something, but have no idea what. It is okay, change can be a good thing. These tips are designed to help you make the changes you want (and need) without losing your sanity.
Start small- If you try to go from a soda drinking carnivore to a super-vegan overnight, your body will have withdrawals and there is likely to be some pain as a result. You are also less likely to succeed if you try to do too much at once. Make a list of the behaviors you want to change. Label the ones you think will be easiest and which are likely to be the hardest. Knock a few of the smaller ones off first and work your way up to the harder ones.

Along these lines, you should tackle a mini-goal every week. If your goal is to eat more fruits and veggies than a mini-goal would be to eat a full serving every evening with dinner. If you want to cut out sweets than your mini-goal for one week would be to stock your cupboards with nutritious substitutes. Though they seem small, they really add up. As an added bonus, you will feel like you are accomplishing a lot because you are.

Look at the cause of your habit- If you get bored and snack, then boredom, not hunger, is the issue. Keep your hands and mind busy with something you enjoy. If stress is your trigger look for ways to relax. Stress is dangerous and can lead to heart disease, TMJ (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/tmj-disorders/orthognatic-repositioning/), stomach problems, ulcers, and more. The point is, you can’t overcome the symptom if you don’t know what the cause is.

Have realistic goals- You would not expect to take one karate class and be a master. It takes 21 days for you to build a pattern and 66 days for that pattern to become automatic. Your goals should be challenging, but possible. Do not chide yourself if you mess up, just learn from it and keep going.

Make a specific plan and write it down- You may forget in 30 days what your goal was. By then you have been doing it for long enough that it feels as though it’s always been that way. Writing your plan down helps you keep track of the progress you’ve made and helps you stay on track.

Become consciously aware of what you are eating- Yes, eating less sugar is a great goal. But you can’t just stop putting it in your coffee and assume you got it all. Sugar is in everything from BBQ sauce to beer to most canned goods. Start reading your labels. A good rule of thumb is that if you can pronounce what’s in it, you’re probably okay.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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The Controversy Surrounding Ozone Dentistry

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When most people think of the Ozone, they immediately think of the protective layer which surrounds our planet. In the dental world, “Ozone” means something completely different. Though it is still a very new practice, some dentists believe that by introducing O3 (Ozone) gas into a cavity (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/), that the decay process can be halted.

Virtually every time you eat or drink anything but water, sugars are left on your teeth. These sugars provide food for bacteria that occur naturally in your mouth. So, when these bacteria have an overabundant food supply (caused by poor oral hygiene) they grow in numbers. When there get to be too many, they wreak havoc on your enamel. For more information visit https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/periodontics-gum-disease/.

The theory behind using ozone is that it kills bacteria. If you destroy the bacteria which cause tooth decay (cariogenic) then you essentially halt the decay process. It may seem odd to use Ozone as a treatment, but it has been used in medical and industrial applications for years.

The process for making O3 is extremely technical, but basically O3 is made by splitting an oxygen molecule (O2) in half. You are left with O. This molecule is the attached to another O2 and we get O3. The higher concentration of oxygen emits a slight scent. If you have ever been in the woods after a lightning strike you may know this smell.

This extra molecule does not have as strong of a bond as the first two molecules so it will abandon ship and bond with other molecules if given the chance. When this happens it is called oxidation, and oxidation destroys many microorganisms.

Once microorganisms are destroyed, minerals can return to your teeth causing them to harden back up and, in some cases, reverse the effects of decay. A mineral rich solution is used to speed up the repair process. From the research we do have, it seems unlikely that decay will return to a tooth once it has been re-mineralized. Several treatments may be given to enhance the results.

From its uses in the medical field, we know that Ozone is safe and has little if any side effects. Research has not tested the specific effects of Ozone on the teeth and gums, but considering it is naturally produced in our bodies, no one expects the result to be any different from the medical results.

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Right now, you are probably thinking “This sounds great! Why aren’t all dentists using this?” Well, that is a great question. For starters, the process is not proven. Some studies have shown success in trials, but not enough success to make the research conclusive. Developing this technology would be expensive, this is why the FDA has not readily allowed Ozone to be used in the United States.

The Ozone method only works for minor caries. It cannot reverse huge caities. For these, I recommend an extraction and implant (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/prosthodontics/implants/). This being said, for many dentists it would not be a cost effective option even with full FDA approval. If it had the potential to restore a larger area, it would seem a more justified cost.

Nevertheless, using Ozone would open many doors and provide many options. If dental procedures can be made more comfortable for the patient, than they should be. And, whenever we have an opportunity to use better and safer materials we should.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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The Importance of Saliva

Very few people think about their saliva until they no longer have any. But, this liquid impacts your health every minute of every day. Even while you are asleep, your saliva is working hard to keep the balance in your mouth.

Saliva is derived from your blood. Like tears, which are formed in the lacrimal gland, saliva is formed when blood passes through capillaries. These small capillaries do not allow the bigger cellular components and proteins to pass through. What results is saliva. All of this saliva is distributed throughout your mouth using ducts.

We get more than just the watery basis from our blood. All of the proteins, enzymes (amylase), minerals, and proteins in your blood carry over and influence the health of your saliva. The better the health of your blood, the better the health of your saliva.

Now the question becomes… why is healthy saliva important?

Saliva contains a lot of antibodies, which fight off bacteria and viruses. There is a sort of pump system which keeps your saliva stocked with antibodies. Since most bacteria enter your body through the mouth and nose, having strong antibodies in these areas is your first line of defense against sickness.

Your glands are constantly producing saliva. It is released continuously, but when you eat or think about food the glands are stimulated and more saliva is produced. Even the act of chewing, regardless of if there is any food in your mouth, will contract your salivary glands and release more saliva.

Saliva helps wash away leftover food particles. It is not always possible to brush after every meal, saliva washes away the bacterial food source until you have a chance to brush, floss, and or rinse. Proper saliva production prevents gum disease, tooth decay, and periodontic gum disease (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/periodontics-gum-disease/) by washing away extra bacteria.

Digestion is aided by saliva. In fact, without saliva our food would taste bland. It acts as a lubricant for your taste buds, making them sensitive to the main taste groups. If you do not produce enough saliva, it may be difficult to swallow and digest food. When food is not properly mixed with saliva, fungus, yeast, and bacteria will build in your stomach. Digestive diseases can easily spread to your mouth.

Some people have a condition called xerostomia, or chronic dry mouth. They are more likely to have dental complications. Anyone who has this condition should drink a lot of water. This will wash your mouth out like saliva and prevent dehydration which decreases saliva flow even more. Also, try rinsing 4-6 x per day with a baking soda solution. Use 2 tsp of baking soda per 8 oz glass of water.

A dentist may be able to prescribe you medication or give you suggestions for supplements to help your condition. Proper dental care becomes even more important if you have saliva production issues because you lose that first line of defense. Getting regular cleanings and check-ups will prevent decay and may help you produce more saliva. Saliva production can be increased by chewing sugar-free gum or eating sugar-free mints.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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What is Geographic Tongue? How to Treat It?

For it being one of the most common maladies affecting the tongue, most people have never heard of Geographic tongue. After all, it sounds a bit like slang for a savvy speaker. This condition is common and relatively harmless. If you are unfamiliar with geographic tongue, seeing it appear out of nowhere can cause any parent to go into a frenzy.

The name “geographic tongue” refers to the map-like appearance of shapes. Some patches are completely smooth making your tongue look like it is covered in tiny, tongue-colored oceans. Most commonly this condition affects the sides of your tongue, but it can occur in other parts of your mouth as well (for answers to other common questions see https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/).

At any given time, geographic tongue affects between 1 to 5% of American’s in various age brackets. Like fibromyalgia, however, this disease is most commonly found in women. This condition looks super scary, but it will not harm you and it is mostly treatable. There is no indication that cancer, or other serious diseases, develop as a result.

Also known as erythema migrans or benign migratory glossitis, geographic tongue occurs when papillae (the bumps are your tongue) are missing from one are and crowded into the light area of the tongue. No one knows what causes papillae to move away from areas of your tongue and into others, but genetics is the most common theory.
Individual who already have psoriasis or a fissured tongue are more likely to experience geographic tongue. This leads many scientist to believe it is related to these other ailments. Geographic tongue comes without warning, sometimes leaving on its own within a few days. At other times, it can last for a year or more.

Most patients do not report sensitivity, but 1 out of every 10 people may have burning, tingling, or pain. These symptoms are made worse by ingesting foods which are acidic, spicy, salty or hot and by using certain toothpaste and smoking cigarettes (More ways cigarettes impact your mouth can be found at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/oral-surgery-wisdom-teeth/. While you have the condition, consider a sensitivity friendly toothpaste.

If you have geographic tongue do not be surprised to see some areas healing while others get worse. Even with treatment, your tongue may not heal all at once. Your first step, if you think you have geographic tongue is to visit a qualified dentist or doctor to rule out other conditions.

There are many conditions which cause similar patches on the tongue (AIDS, thrush, oral lichen planus, syphilis, and certain cancers). All of these have a different course of treatment from the treatments given for geographic tongue. Geographic tongue does usually heal by itself, but if you have pain or your condition is severe, there are treatments to help you along your way.

For pain, a mild over-the-counter pain reliever is usually prescribed along with anti-inflammatory medication. To treat the condition itself zinc supplements, corticosteroids, and antiseptic mouthwash are the usual methods used. Alternative therapies such as meditation, chakra cleansing, medical marijuana, and Reiki have not been conclusively proven, but many patients have a great deal of success with them.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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Flossing With Braces

Many patients, when fitted with braces, later find trying to floss to be an ordeal. Even knowing the importance of flossing, many patients, especially younger ones will give up and quit flossing altogether. If you have a child with braces, it is very important to their continued oral health that they continue to floss. After all, bacteria can build up and start causing decay in a matter of weeks.

Teenagers, being stubborn at times, need extra motivation to follow their oral care routine. Despite what they may tell you, it actually is possible to floss with braces (see: https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/interceptive-orthodontics/braces/ for more information). But, there are some rules everyone wearing braces should follow to get the most out of flossing.

We all know that time is a very precious commodity, but brushing your teeth is not the time to rush. You only get one set of teeth, so protecting them is a big deal. When you get braces, be prepared to devote 3x as much time to your dental hygiene routine. Working around the bands, wires, and brackets takes extra care. If you have small children you may want to time them to make sure they have devoted enough time to flossing and brushing. Or, you may even want to floss for them (visit: https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/pedodontics-child-care/ for more information about my options for children).

When flossing for your kids, make sure they are seated and not moving. Easier said than done, I know, but offering a reward can be enough motivation to soothe their restlessness. Putting on their favorite movie, TV show, or music should distract them long enough for you to give their teeth a once over.

Not all floss is the same. If you have braces, make sure that you use a waxed floss. The unwaxed type can easily get caught in your wires when they shred. Some companies offer floss that is specially designed to work with braces, not against them. Be sure to pull off a piece around 1.5 feet (18″) long so you have enough to wrap it around your fingers and get sufficient control on the floss.

Instead of pulling the floss from the top of your tooth down to the bottom, wearing braces means passing the floss between your teeth but under the wires. Once it is through, use a gently back and forth or up and down motion until you feel the area is clean.

If you have difficulty weaving the floss due to spacing problems (the need for braces in the first place), try using an alternative methods, such as a water pick or a brush designed for flossing. The latter will look like a small bottle brush and are sold and nearly any supermarket. There are threads too. These will act similarly to a sewing needle, pulling the floss through.

Braces are designed to help straighten teeth and give you a better smile. If you do not pay attention, though, it is the perfect time for plaque to build, which eventually leads to Periodontal Gum Disease (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/periodontics-gum-disease/). All of the hidden areas of your mouth need extra care. Just an extra note, usually a patient’s mouth is sensitive for the first few days after braces are put on. Take this into consideration for those first few times brushing and flossing to avoid children associating flossing with pain.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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How to Find the Right Denture Adhesive

The only thing worse than an improperly fitting denture is when your denture adhesive fails to help. There are many claims, from many manufacturers about how long their adhesive lasts, which one has the strongest hold, tastes the best, the list goes on. Essentially, there is some degree of trial and error.

Everyone’s mouth is slightly different, but there are some key things to keep in mind when picking out a denture adhesive brand. The first thing to become familiar with is the main types of adhesives: cream/paste, powder, strips, pads, woven cloth strips, and wafers. The specific differences between these will be discussed in a later article.

Dentures are made out of a hard type of resin or porcelain. This material makes them stronger. Once dentures (partial or full) are molded they are no longer flexible with the naturally occurring changes to your bone structure. After several years, they will usually need to be re-molded to fit your mouth (for more information on dentures visit: https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/prosthodontics/dentures/).

The denture adhesives available are supposed to make your denture feel more comfortable and to strengthen the hold they have to your natural gum line. They also provide a cushion between your soft gums and the hard plastic. But, not everyone needs adhesive. If your dentures have a secure fit on their own, you may not need to use any. Just keep in mind that for certain occasions, an adhesive can prevent them from slipping out at inopportune times.

Any denture wearer will tell you there are some foods which cannot be eaten. Hard carrots, most nuts, corn on the cob, and even a tough steak can be painful and difficult to eat. How well an adhesive holds should be on the top of your list. When you apply the cream, powder, paste, etc… to your denture make sure it is dry. Water can prevent the glue from sticking, making it impossible for your dentures to be held in place.

Everyone knows what it feels like to get something caught in their teeth. This experience pales in comparison to having a small piece of food land in between your gum line and dental device. It can be awkward when this happens in public. Look for how firm the seal is. If bits of food get through, try a different brand or type.

The health of your whole body is very important so regardless of what method you choose make sure the product is zinc-free. In large enough quantities, zinc can have major negative effects on your health.

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You can’t do much about the bad taste that comes from using adhesives. All you can do is remove them as quickly as possible. Flavored and all-natural products help, but it’s not going to be fantastic… Ever. Just be prepared and remove your paste as soon as possible. If you want to maintain your hold all day, be sure to avoid super hot liquids. Make regular visits to your dentist for denture adjustments to ensure they have the longest lifespan possible.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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Oral Ecology

There are bacteria found in our mouths which are found in few other places. The ecology of the human mouth refers to all of the organisms that dwell within it. In this respect, our mouths are like a foreign planet. There are good bacteria and bad bacteria and a watery, hot, and humid climate which makes the perfect environment for both of them to thrive in.

In every human mouth, there are two primary ecological components: bacteria and saliva. Even those with the cleanest mouths can be expected to have between 1,000 to 100,000 bacteria living on each tooth. These bacteria do not all belong to the same species. On average, 500 or more species of bacteria will live in any given mouth. The bacteria which dwell in our mouth have the potential to be devastating, but they also serve a vital role in keeping our mouths healthy by keeping “bad bacteria” from overwhelming our mouths.

Oral ecology is of particular importance to some dentists and biologists. By seeking to understand how all of the species interact and the symbiotic relationship they have with saliva, we can better understand how to treat conditions which affect the mouth. Their particular area of focus tends to be on the prevention and treatment of gum disease (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/periodontics-gum-disease/).

In the late 1950’s and early 1960’s a campaign was launched to reduce tooth decay by promoting brushing and flossing and by adding fluoride to the water supply. Researchers had singled out a specific species of bacteria that was causing cavities. When fluoride is added to water, then an individual drinks it, the fluoride bonds to the tooth enamel making it harder for bacteria to attach themselves.

Currently, about 51% of children in the United States, under the age of 12, have no sign of tooth decay. This is a promising number until you think about the remaining 49%. If fluoride works so well for some children, but not for others, then the oral ecology of those children may be the culprit.

Thanks to the research that has been conducted over the past two decades, we know that the bacteria primarily responsible for periodontal gum disease are anaerobic, meaning they do not need oxygen to survive. Scientists devoted to the study of oral ecology have discovered roughly a dozen species of bacteria that cause infections and tooth decay. Left untreated, serious dental procedures may become necessary to fix the condition (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/endodontics-root-canal/).

More importantly, though, they have begun to understand how these bacteria colonize and how they are transferred. Biologists and biotechnologists have also discovered how these bacteria interact with each other. These discoveries have the potential to lead us to safe and effective ways to remove harmful bacteria before they do permanent damage.

Saliva acts as our mouth’s wash cycle, removing all of the extra bacteria and particles we don’t need. For people with reduced saliva production, there is limited natural defense against bacterial growth. The field of biotechnology is attempting to create synthetic saliva for those who do not produce enough. It will effectively act as a sluice to remove bacteria before it can take up residence.

Our mouths are a delicate and fragile ecosystem. It is not just how we maintain our mouth which is important, but also the quality of the food which passes through it. Decades may pass before we know the true impact of GMO’s and processed food on our bodies as a whole. But, some foods, particularly sweet and sticky foods, are clearly bad for your oral ecology. These foods should be avoided whenever possible to preserve the health of your mouth.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. J.J.Edderai. A dental check-up every three months will allow Dr. Edderai and his hygienists to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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Origins of the Toothbrush

The toothbrush, as we think of it today, was not developed until the year 1938, but its history goes back much further. The concept of oral hygiene dates to roughly 5000 BCE. The ancient Egyptians made a paste of eggs shells and used their fingers to scrub the tartar off of their teeth. Fifteen hundred years later the ancient empires of Babylon and Egypt first used frayed twigs to scrub their teeth clean.

The importance of keeping a clean mouth was well known to the Egyptians. We can tell this due to the number of these “tooth sticks” which have been found in burial chambers of Pharaohs and commoners alike.

Just around the geographical corner from Egypt, in China, the idea of chewing sticks developed around 1600 BCE. In China, they used aromatic trees, such as Cinnamomum cassia, Catalpa, pine, and aloe, to freshen their breath. As far as archaeologists can tell, the Chinese culture was the first to sharpen a chewing stick on one end to get between teeth.

Using a stick, in one form or another, was the primary oral hygiene method in Africa and they remain popular there. The Greeks and the Romans used toothpicks to clean their teeth instead of chewing sticks, but the concept was the same. More information on modern dental services: https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/

The first known brush with bristles comes from the Tang Dynasty in China, circa 619-907 CE. The bristles were made of the bristly hairs of hogs. In China, the bristles were transported from Siberia and Northern China because the cold temperatures made the bristles firmer.

Those who could afford it would have the hog bristles attached to a fine ox or whalebone. The poorer population, if they could afford a toothbrush, would have a handle made from bamboo, bone, wood or other easily accessible items. To this day, some Chinese monks use a toothbrush made out of oxen bone and horsehair.

The popularity of this new design spread, via the trade routes, into various parts of Europe. In Europe, the model was adapted to use horse hair instead of hog hair. The design evolved and some styles had greater popularity than others. From artifacts, we can tell that toothbrushes have been made from feathers, various animal hairs, and porcupine quills.

A more modern design was given to the toothbrush by a British man named William Addis in 1780. This company has changed hands, and names, several times, but it remains one of the largest toothbrush distributors in the United Kingdom. The bristles were still made of hog-hair, but the handle was carved from a sturdier cattle bone. The first design which featured rows was created 64 years later.

The invention of nylon in the early 1900’s brought toothbrushes to a whole new level. The first modern form of the toothbrush was developed in 1938. By the 1950’s manufacturers had discovered how to make bristles of varied softness and styles.

It was during the 1960’s that the first electric toothbrush hit the stores. Since then, toothbrushes have primarily been made of nylon and plastic. Designs, styles, and colors have changed, but this basic idea has been an industry standard for nearly 60 years. Thankfully we now know how to package them so they are sterile and manufacture them so they remove the most tartar. For more information on keeping your mouth healthy, visit: https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. J.J.Edderai. A dental check-up every three months will allow Dr. Edderai and any of his Hygienists to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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How to Combat the Effects of Pregnancy on Your Teeth

Pregnancy is undoubtedly a joyous occasion, but if you don’t take the proper precautions serious damage can be done to your mouth. Women are warned not to smoke, not to eat shellfish, and to get plenty of exercise. These are all good pieces of advice, but the list frequently ignores the best ways to keep your mouth from deteriorating in the process.

The belief that babies strip the calcium from your teeth while in utero is exactly that, a myth. As long as you have a nutritionally sufficient diet, your baby will get all the vitamins it needs. You can add supplements if you have any doubt, but the only way a baby would strip calcium from your bones and “NOT TEETH” is if they don’t get it through these methods.

The surge of hormones which occur from pregnancy can affect how your mouth fight plaque. A woman’s body is focused on other things aside from fighting plaque. Luckily, this is easy enough to fight.

You were, hopefully, brushing at least twice a day before becoming pregnant. This habit should continue throughout your pregnancy, in fact, I recommend increasing it to three times per day. The best times to brush are before breakfast in the morning and before you go to bed.

Anything acidic weakens your enamel by reproducing the oral bacteria at a faster pace than usual, so be sure to wait at least an hour after eating anything acidic after brushing. The same goes for morning sickness, do not wait long after vomiting to brush. Fight that after-taste by rubbing fluoride toothpaste on your teeth with your finger.

Gestational diabetes causes all of the problems type 2 diabetes does, including tooth loss. Recent research suggests that Vitamin D may help prevent gestational diabetes from occurring. More than 30 studies have been conducted which show vitamin D as a pre-cursor for gestational health.

While your obstetrician may prescribe you vitamin D supplements, be sure to consult regularly with Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai or any of our Hygienists to make sure your teeth show no signs of diabetes. Also, be sure to tell us if you are pregnant. There are some dental procedures which may be dangerous if you are pregnant.

Pregnant women may experience non-cancerous growths known as pregnancy tumors. These usually go away on their own once the baby is born. Sometimes these (gum growth) tumors get large enough to impact chewing and saliva production. If this happens, or if they become painful, Dr. Edderai may elect to remove them.

Pregnancy tumors usually develop because of an irritant on the gum line (see more information at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/). Keeping your teeth clean will reduce your risk of developing these abnormalities. If they are caused by plaque build-up, this can usually be treated. This condition is more common in women who also have pregnancy gingivitis.

As early as two months into your pregnancy signs of pregnancy gingivitis can begin to surface. If you previously had gingivitis, it is likely to become worse while carrying a child. If this condition is left untreated, it can cause periodontitis. (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/periodontics-gum-disease/).

The best prevention and treatment methods for both of these conditions Dr. Edderai recommends proper oral hygiene and monthly visits with our hygienists. We can detect early on if there are any conditions which may become worse if left unattended. If you do not practice prevention, dental restorative procedures may be needed in the future (https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/cerec/).

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai. A dental check-up every three to four months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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The 5 Worst Foods for Your Teeth

With the busy, chaotic lives so many of us lead today, eating healthy becomes hard work for most of us. When it comes to keeping your smile healthy, though, there are ten foods you can eat less of that will keep you, and your dentist, happy for a very long time.
There are three basics to look for in your food which can help you easily determine if it is a smart choice. If your food has all three of these, brush immediately after you eat it or, even better, avoid it all together:

• Stickiness.
• How long it takes to dissolve.
• The acid/sugar content.

Sticky foods: Foods which are sticky, such as peanut butter and gummy candies are delicious but bad for your teeth. It isn’t just because of all the sugar they contain either. Since these foods do not get washed away easily with saliva, they will stay put until you brush or wash them away. Sticky foods build up plaque and increase your risk of getting periodontal disease (For more information visit https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/periodontics-gum-disease/).This doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a nice PB&J, just brush soon after. If you can’t brush, rinse thoroughly with water and brush as soon as you can.

Hard Candies: Even the sugar-free kind put you at risk for broken teeth. The types that are full of sugar slowly dissolve that sugar over your teeth, creating a never-ending buffet for bacteria. If you insist on eating hard candy, at least avoid crunching it. This is the #1 cause of dental emergencies around the country.

Sports Drinks: Just because it has the word “sport” in the name do not assume it is safe for your teeth. The goal of sports drinks is to give you energy. Sugar is the main source of energy in most of these drinks and it will linger in your mouth long after your drink is gone. They can be helpful for athletes, but most physicians agree they are not necessary. I recommend looking for a low sugar version or consuming water instead.

Alcohol: I am not saying you should not enjoy an occasional drink, but those who heavily consume alcoholic beverages develop dry mouth and general dehydration as a result. If you drink in excess you can experience premature tooth decay and become prone to infections. As if that wasn’t enough of a reason to drink less, heavy alcohol consumption puts you at a higher risk for developing mouth cancer (See more effects of alcohol at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/oral-surgery-wisdom-teeth/).

Pickled Anything: The pickling process involves vinegar and, usually, large amounts of sugar as well. The acidic nature of ketchup, pickles, and pickled veggies is really bad for your enamel. Basically, it is like submerging your teeth in an acid bath. Salt and vinegar chips, while unbelievably addictive, chafe your teeth and make them vulnerable to staining. For information on counteracting the effects of staining please visit: https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/dental-services/cosmetic-dentistry/teeth-whitening/.

If you lack the willpower or desire to avoid your favorite foods at least consume sugary foods with your meals when saliva production is the strongest. You can also drink plenty of water, limit snacking in-between meals, and brush your teeth twice a day.

Before treating gum, tooth, or other oral problems consult with Dr. JJ Edderai (a well-respected Miami dentist who has earned the trust of his patients for their dental care needs). A dental check-up every six months will allow Dr. Edderai to keep a watchful eye on your oral health and prevent cavities before they start. For answers to some of the most commonly asked questions, visit my FAQ page at https://www.northmiamibeachdentist.com/faqs/.

Copyright Dr. Jean-Jacques Edderai -2015

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